Serafini and Serafini Professional Corporation | 269 Hamburg Turnpike - Wayne, New Jersey | Phone: 973-595-9500 Toll Free: 800-371-1730
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FAQs - If you have a question that does not appear here, please contact us!

A certified civil trial attorney is a designation granted by the New Jersey Supreme Court to attorneys who are able to demonstrate sufficient levels of experience, education, knowledge, and skill in civil trial practice. The Supreme Court, through its Board on Attorney Certification, designates only those lawyers who apply for certification and who are able to meet the standards set by the Board and approved by the Court.

A New Jersey attorney who is certified by the Supreme Court as a civil trial attorney must meet these requirements:

  • Member in good standing of the New Jersey bar for more than 5 years
  • Fulfilled ongoing continuing legal education requirements
  • Demonstrated a substantial level of experience in civil trial law
  • Been favorably evaluated by other attorneys and judges familiar with his or her work
  • Taken and passed a written examination in civil trial law

The Certification program helps the public find attorneys who have demonstrated proficiency in specialized fields of law, including civil trial law, criminal trial law, matrimonial law, and workers’ compensation law. Certification helps lawyers by giving them a way to make their experience known to the public and to other lawyers. Certification also encourages the maintenance and improvement of attorney competence in specialized fields of law.

Roughly 3% of New Jersey lawyers achieve this status.

When you have completed medical treatment and we have obtained all of the medical records required to document the injuries and losses in your case, a settlement package is submitted to the insurance company.  If you are offered an acceptable amount to settle your claim, then the case is settled. This process typically takes between a few weeks to several months.  If you do not find the settlement offer acceptable, your case may be taken to court.
This depends on several things. After your lawsuit is filed, your case may be arbitrated, with an independent attorney acting as the arbitrator during the hearing. Both sides of the case are presented and the arbitrator will make a decision on the case. If both sides accept the decision, your case is considered settled. However, the case can usually proceed to trial by judge or jury if either side is does not accept the arbitration. Trials may not take place until years after a lawsuit is filed.  It is possible for your lawsuit to be settled at any time before the trial.
The Defendant has the right to have you examined by a physician of their choice and at their expense. The independent medical examination is  for the defense.
As we prepare your case for either an arbitration or trial, there will be a number of discovery processes that will involve either you or one of our lawyers. During this period, each side has the right to submit questions to the other side. You may be required to answer these questions under oath and you may be required to supply documents that support your losses. We provide guidance through the process, helping you with all aspects and helping you understand the process. Both sides also have the right to take depositions of the parties and witnesses to the lawsuit. These depositions are typically a series of questions under oath relating to your injuries, the accident that caused them and the effect on your life.
This is dependent upon the nature of the case and the extent of injuries. Some considerations:

  • length of treatment
  • severity of the injury
  • loss of wages
  • pain and suffering
  • permanent disability

When all of the evidence has been reviewed, we can more accurately determine the potential value / outcome of your case.